Recent Videos

  • Your Inner Fish – Neil Shubin – PBS (2014)

    Your Inner Fish – Neil Shubin – PBS (2014)

    Your Inner Fish, is the first installment of a three part PBS series by Neil Shubin. After a quick review of our shared anatomy with the fish and a whirlwind tour along the evolutionary timeline, the program plunges us into the fascinating saga of discovery of the tetrapods that explains how limbs of the terrestrial vertebrates came to be. Watch how the legendary 375 million year old (Devonian) tetrapod fossil Tiktaalik was discovered after a series of adventurous Arctic expeditions. […]

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  • Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on Board ISS – NASA/SVS (2017)

    Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on Board ISS – NASA/SVS (2017)

    NASA’s Cloud-Aerosol Transport System is a remote-sensing instrument installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2015. Using LIDAR technology it scans a vertical slice of the atmosphere for natural as well as human made aerosols and clouds. The near-real-time data transmitted from the ISS enables CATS team to process it within six hours. One of the natural aerosol sources is volcanoes. In April 2015, the CATS instrument provided a detailed profile of the south Chilean volcano Calbuco when it […]

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  • The Central Dogma of Biology – Kazufumi Watanabe (2008)

    The Central Dogma of Biology – Kazufumi Watanabe (2008)

    Riken Omics Center from Japan presents a well-crafted animation that summarizes one of the most important subjects of biology since 1958. The central dogma is our first systematic approach in understanding nature of the information flow and manufacture of structures within a living cell. The viewer must be warned that the structures in this animation are artistic representations and in reality they look quite different from space ships. For example RNA Polymerase II is one of the most well-studied enzymes […]

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  • The World’s Most Boring TV … and Why It’s Hilariously Addictive – Thomas Hellum – TED Talk (2014)

    The World’s Most Boring TV … and Why It’s Hilariously Addictive – Thomas Hellum – TED Talk (2014)

    The idea of “slow-TV” was there. For years live cameras have been showing bears hunt fish in rivers, birds nesting and rearing their chicks with viewers in the millions. A Discovery Channel series called “Earth Sunrise” recorded a full hour of realtime sunrise in spectacular locations from around the world. Recording of a total solar eclipse in Brazil and Turkey was quite a memorable event. Slow-TV concept is a paradigm invented by real-time nature observers. The Norwegian television producer Thomas […]

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  • Chimpanzee – Alastair Fothergill and Mark Linfield (2012)

    Chimpanzee – Alastair Fothergill and Mark Linfield (2012)

    The Chimpanzee is a heavily anthropomorphosized docu-feature movie targeting young audiences. It was filmed on multiple locations including Taï National Park in southwestern Ivory Coast, Ngogo and Kibale national parks in Uganda and Gabon by two British nature filmmakers Alastair Fothergill and Mark Linfield. Martyn Colbeck was the person behind the camera. Tim Allen did the narration. Filmmakers stitched the footage recorded in these locations and consolidated into a single story creating a drama around an orphaned baby Chimpanzee they […]

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  • Origins of Human Cumulative Culture – UCL (2017)

    Origins of Human Cumulative Culture – UCL (2017)

    Captain James Cook was fascinated by Polynesians’ ability to converse with each other. In Tahiti a high priest named Tupaia got on board and accompanied him along their voyage to Hawaii. Despite the fact that the two islands were separated by more than 2500 miles Tupaia was able to converse perfectly with Hawaiians. In order to maintain a common language these seemingly isolated islands must have been connected by frequent trans-oceanic voyages. Genetical and ecological theory dictates that connectivity is […]

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  • At an Mbendjele Camp in Congo – Gül Deniz Salalı (2015)

    At an Mbendjele Camp in Congo – Gül Deniz Salalı (2015)

    These footage were recorded in an Mbendjele BaYaka Pygmies camp of northern Congo-Brazzaville during a year long field study on Human behavior by a UCL researcher Gül Deniz Salalı. The Mbendjele camp filmed here is called Masia. The videos highlighted here are a part of a much larger project aiming to understand the origins of the human cumulative culture. The main video shows how a woman named Semoi (wearing red African fabric) harvests tubers of wild yam (Dioscorea) locally called […]

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  • A Tour of the Cryosphere – NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (2009)

    A Tour of the Cryosphere – NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (2009)

    The cryosphere covers parts of the Earth’s surface where water is found in the form of snow, sea ice, glaciers, permafrost, ice sheets, and icebergs. Ice and snow exist close to their melting point. Fluctuations in surface temperatures of our planet leads to frequent state changes in water from solid to liquid and back. Using satellite observations scientists monitor such changes in the global and regional climate. The Earth’s cryosphere shrink and expand on a yearly basis. The animation begins […]

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  • Albatross Nest Live from Hawaii

    Albatross Nest Live from Hawaii

    If you see a dark screen, bear in mind that it might be night time in Hawaii. Breeding season 2016 has ended happily. See y’all in 2017! Welcome to an Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) nest from the island of Kauai, geologically the oldest island of the Hawaiian archipelago. The webcam is operated by the Bird Lab of Cornell University. The Laysan Albatross gets its name from its Laysan breeding colony in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, where it is the second […]

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  • Weekly Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Age During 1984 – 2016 – NASA/SVS (2017)

    Weekly Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Age During 1984 – 2016 – NASA/SVS (2017)

    NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS) has produced an animation showing the sea ice dynamics in the Arctic. The diminishing ratio of multi-year sea ice is staggering. Human contribution to global warming is well documented. The response of the polar regions to heating especially in the Arctic is extremely fast. While scientists are rushing to predict future temperature and precipitation using exceedingly complex climate models, the behavior of the cryosphere is a curious one. We are already witnessing rather large glacial […]

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  • A Day in the Life of an Elite Male Greater Sage-Grouse on the Lek – Marc Dantzker – Cornell Lab of Ornithology (2015)

    A Day in the Life of an Elite Male Greater Sage-Grouse on the Lek – Marc Dantzker – Cornell Lab of Ornithology (2015)

    Here’s another fascinating piece of natural history from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. In this series of short observations staff producer and biologist Marc Dantzker breaks down the mating behavior and social interaction of the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in five sections. Lekking or lek mating is a breeding behavior where males come together in a place and perform competitive displays to impress visiting females. While males do their “hello check me out” dances, females asses their qualities and choose […]

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  • A Leafcutter Ant Colony in Barro Colorado Island

    A Leafcutter Ant Colony in Barro Colorado Island

    Filmed on Jan 28th 2017 during the dry season. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institue (STRI) Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama. Leafcutter ants are an impressive group with more than 40 different species. All evolved and diversified in the New World at around 12 million years ago. Phylogenetic evidence suggests their evolution could go back as far as 50 million years ago when America separated from Africa. A mature colony can have more than 8 million workers collectively farming a subterranean fungus. […]

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  • Ecology from the Air – Greg Asner (2009) TED Talk

    Ecology from the Air – Greg Asner (2009) TED Talk

    Being able to measure interaction of the living and the non-living at large continental-scales is eye opening. That’s what successful scientist Greg Asner does with the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO). NASA’s Landsat earth observation satellites have been feeding us invaluable global-scale data for more than 40 years. The new satellite Landsat 8 began transmitting near-realtime information. Thanks to these earth observation satellites we can instantly know scale of natural or human-made impacts on ecosystems. Deforestation for oil palm plantations in […]

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  • The Navigators / Pathfinders of the Pacific – Sanford Low and Boyd Estus (1983)

    The Navigators / Pathfinders of the Pacific – Sanford Low and Boyd Estus (1983)

    Navigation on the open ocean has been a grand challenge for Humanity. Vikings used Icelandic feldspar chrystals called sunstones enabling detection of the direction of the sun through polarizing light. Chinese used magnetic compass. Calculation of the longitude was an immense problem. Celestial objects have been used by almost all seafarers globally. Polinesians mastered the star compass technique and carried it to a new level in Human history. “The Navigators” was co-directed by Sam Low and Boyd Estus covering the […]

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  • Geological History of the Continents/Paleomap Project –  Christopher Scotese (2015)

    Geological History of the Continents/Paleomap Project – Christopher Scotese (2015)

    Geology and biological evolution of life are inseparable. More than half of the minerals now incorporated into the upper crust of our planet were produced by living organisms. The movement of continental plates has played a fundamental role in the recycling of mineral resources by the biosphere. Scientists now predict that tectonic activity may have been one of the prerequisites for the origin of life. The acceptance of continental drift by the scientific community and how it affected Earth’s history […]

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