Recent Videos

  • Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) – Biosphere 2

    Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) – Biosphere 2

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better. -Samuel Beckett- Biosphere 2 started as quite an ambitious challenge. It crammed five biomes into 3 acres of sealed facility and tried to create a mesocosm experiment. It was a “ship-in-a-bottle” style miniaturization of ecosystems; a tiny little man-made Hawaii in the Arizona desert (Hawaii is the only place on our planet where all biomes of the world, excepting Arctic Tundra exist). Biomes of the Biosphere 2 were […]

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  • The Making of the Fittest: Evolving Switches, Evolving Bodies – HHMI – Sean Carrol (2012)

    The Making of the Fittest: Evolving Switches, Evolving Bodies – HHMI – Sean Carrol (2012)

    Evolving Switches, Evolving Bodies is one of the series of educational videos called The Making of the Fittest by Sean Carroll for communicating biological evolution to public with the support of HHMI. Evolution is thought to be acting very slow usually over millions of years. However, it can happen suprisingly quick. In this documentary, we look at a fish that evolved to change its body between two states reversibly multiple times over a few thousands years during the last ice […]

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  • The Making of the Fittest: Birth and Death of Genes – HHMI – Sean Carrol (2011)

    The Making of the Fittest: Birth and Death of Genes – HHMI – Sean Carrol (2011)

    A fish caught in Antarctic water by the Norvegian expedition in 1927 tells us another fascinating story on evolution of life. Crocodile fish / icefish Birth and Death of Genes is one of the four educational videos Sean Carroll has produced for communicating biological evolution to public with the support of HHMI. These fishes (called Nothothenoids) are unique for they are the only vertebrates in the world that lack the oxygen-binding protein hemoglobin, which gives blood its red color. They […]

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  • The Day The Mesozoic Died HHMI – Sean B. Carroll (2012)

    The Day The Mesozoic Died HHMI – Sean B. Carroll (2012)

    This is one of the four educational video series by Sean B. Carroll produced for communicating evolution to public with the support of HHMI. Today we know the cause of the dissappearence of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period. This knowledge was produced by the meticulous coordinated work of many scientists. The Day The Mesosoic Died focuses on how scientists do the detective work using the scientific method. The discovery that an asteroid struck the Earth 66 […]

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  • Giant Ichneumon Wasp (Megarhyssa macrurus) Ovipositing

    Giant Ichneumon Wasp (Megarhyssa macrurus) Ovipositing

    Giant Ichneumon wasp (Megaryssa macrurus, Linneaus 1771) ovipositing. 10th of August 2013, Georgia State Botanical Garden, Athens, GA. 3:47 pm. This observation has been registered in iNaturalist.org with ID# 418639. Oviposition marks the beginning of the life cycle of all insects including parasitoid wasps. Females of Megarryhssa macrurus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) are specialized to lay their eggs in the burrows of wood eating Pigeon Tremex Horntail (Tremex columba) larvae between June and September. Only one egg is deposited per host larva […]

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  • BioBlitz!

    BioBlitz!

    In May 2013, National Park Service/National Geographic organized a BioBlitz in Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve near New Orleans, Louisiana. The video above is based on experiences of young participants. Together, they worked with volunteer scientists, teachers, and other community members to find and identify as many species of plants, animals, microbes, fungi as possible within 24-hours. BioBlitzes are set up as part contest, part festival, part educational event and part scientific endeavor. BioBlitz bring together scientists from […]

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  • Appetite for Extinction – Invasive Lionfish of the Bermuda – Robert S. Zuill (2013)

    Appetite for Extinction – Invasive Lionfish of the Bermuda – Robert S. Zuill (2013)

    Lionfish are popular aquarium fish native to the Indo-Pacific region. The lionfish invasion in the western Atlantic began in the mid 1980s off the southern coast of Florida, USA. From Florida, lionfish have spread in all possible directions. By 2000, individuals had been sighted off the coast of North Carolina and Bermuda. First lionfish were reported from the Bahamas in 2004, where they quickly dispersed throughout the archipelago by 2007. The range of lionfish has increased further southward. Lionfish now […]

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  • Long-wattled Umbrellabird Eating Oenocarpus fruit in the Chocó Forests of Ecuador – Luke Browne (2013)

    Long-wattled Umbrellabird Eating Oenocarpus fruit in the Chocó Forests of Ecuador – Luke Browne (2013)

    Long-wattled Umbrellabirds (Cephalopterus penduliger) are important seed dispersers for many plant species, especially the palm Oenocarpus bataua. Here, a motion-activated camera records a male Umbrellabird eating ripe Oenocarpus fruit on the ground at Bilsa Biological Station in the Chocó forests of western Ecuador. You can notice the pronounced wattle and crest characteristic of male Umbrellabirds. Because of extensive habitat loss across its range (Ecuador and Colombia), populations of Umbrellabirds are declining rapidly and are considered vulnerable to extinction. The Karubian […]

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  • Humboldt Bay Eagle Cam – Arcata CA

    Humboldt Bay Eagle Cam – Arcata CA

    Live streaming video by Ustream Main camera (above) Camera 2 (below) Live streaming video by Ustream Welcome to the nest of a pair of bald eagles in Humboldt Bay, Arcata, California. Constructed on top of a douglas fir tree this nest has a well recorded breeding history going back to 2006. In 2013 breeding season two nest cameras were installed by Institute for Wildlife Studies who monitors a number of active nests in the area. Humboldt Bay Eagles nest is […]

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  • Brown Wood Rail singing in the Chocó forests of Ecuador – Luke Browne (2013)

    Brown Wood Rail singing in the Chocó forests of Ecuador – Luke Browne (2013)

    The Brown Wood Rail (Aramides wolfi) is a poorly known bird from western Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Because of extensive habitat loss,it’s considered vulnerable to extinction with less than 4,000 individuals remaining. Here, we recorded an individual singing in front of a motion-activated camera trap at Bilsa Biological Station, one of the largest remaining pieces of Chocó forest in western Ecuador. Bilsa is located within Machine-Chindul Ecological Reserve, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador. The Karubian lab at Tulane university has described the […]

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  • International Space Station – ESA (2012)

    International Space Station – ESA (2012)

    As part of the Human Nature series Nature Documentaries would like to draw your attention to the International Space Station. At 350 km (240 miles) above the earth International Space Station is the farthest outpost of humanity. We humans like to experiment on ourselves. That is how we spread all over the world and even reached most isolated islands in the middle of the Pacific ocean. As we discovered new places We invented new ways to live and reproduce. One […]

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  • Invasive Lionfish of the Tropical Atlantic – Marine Ecology Expeditions – Lorenzo Mittiga (2012)

    Invasive Lionfish of the Tropical Atlantic – Marine Ecology Expeditions – Lorenzo Mittiga (2012)

    Lionfish are popular aquarium fish native to the Indo-Pacific region. The lionfish invasion in the western Atlantic began in the mid 1980s off the southern coast of Florida, USA. From Florida, lionfish have spread in all possible directions. By 2000, individuals had been sighted off the coast of North Carolina and Bermuda. First lionfish were reported from the Bahamas in 2004, where they quickly dispersed throughout the archipelago by 2007. The range of lionfish has increased further southward. Lionfish now […]

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  • Pitcher Plants of Palawan – Stewart McPherson (2010)

    Pitcher Plants of Palawan – Stewart McPherson (2010)

    The naturalist and explorer Stewart McPherson sets out to discover new species of pitcher plants on the Island of Palawan in the Philippines. Carnivorous plants have the most impressive adaptations that help them survive comfortably in low-nutrient environments. Most plants absorb nutrients through their root but carnivorous plants trap and digest various invertebrates to get nutrients. Even small frogs and mammals can become prey. McPherson previously discovered 5 new species of pitcher plants and photographed one that has trapped a […]

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  • Bald Eagle Cam – Live from Minnesota

    Bald Eagle Cam – Live from Minnesota

    Stream videos at Ustream The 2014 breeding season for a pair of iconic Bald Eagles in Minnesota has started. After pair bonding and nest repair eagles are now incubating eggs by taking turns. A pair of iconic Bald Eagles have been raising their chicks in Central Minnesota on a nest constructed at 75 feet altitude on a cottonwood tree. You can learn more about this nest from the FAQs page of the website hosting this nestcam. Last year on March […]

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  • Decorah Eagle Cam – Nesting Season 2014

    Decorah Eagle Cam – Nesting Season 2014

    Live feed has begun from the new nest named N2 for Decorah bald eagles. The pair known as “Mom” and “Dad” are visiting and maintaining the nest occasionally. Established by the Raptor Resource Project in 2007 this breeding pair has been under intense observation Bald Eagles in Decorah, Iowa. The pair became famous after the PBS Nature Documentary “American Eagle” in 2008. At one point in 2012 the viewer numbers reached 250 million making the project the most heavily viewed […]

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