Recent Videos

  • Giant Ichneumon Wasp (Megarhyssa macrurus) Ovipositing

    Giant Ichneumon Wasp (Megarhyssa macrurus) Ovipositing

    Giant Ichneumon wasp (Megaryssa macrurus, Linneaus 1771) ovipositing. 10th of August 2013, Georgia State Botanical Garden, Athens, GA. 3:47 pm. This observation has been registered in iNaturalist.org with ID# 418639. Oviposition marks the beginning of the life cycle of all insects including parasitoid wasps. Females of Megarryhssa macrurus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) are specialized to lay their eggs in the burrows of wood eating Pigeon Tremex Horntail (Tremex columba) larvae between June and September. Only one egg is deposited per host larva […]

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  • What’s Really Warming Up Our Planet? NASA – SVS (2015)

    What’s Really Warming Up Our Planet? NASA – SVS (2015)

    NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS) produced yet another visual to show how industrial and natural factors have been contributing to the global warming. These factors are wobbling of Earth’s axis, solar activity, volcanoes, land use, ozone pollution, aerosol pollution, greenhouse gases and their combined effects. The case is rather clear. Combined effects of man made factors follow the trajectory of warming closely. Since 1880 our planet warmed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit and continues to increase. The atmospheric carbon concentration has passed […]

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  • The Day The Mesozoic Died HHMI – Sean B. Carroll (2012)

    The Day The Mesozoic Died HHMI – Sean B. Carroll (2012)

    This is one of the four educational video series by Sean B. Carroll produced for communicating evolution to public with the support of HHMI. Today we know the cause of the disappearance of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period. This knowledge was produced by the meticulous coordinated work of many scientists. The Day The Mesozoic Died focuses on how scientists do the detective work using the scientific method. The discovery that an asteroid struck the Earth 66 […]

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  • PETM – Unearthing Ancient Climate Change – Science Bulletins – AMNH

    PETM – Unearthing Ancient Climate Change – Science Bulletins – AMNH

    Scientists have a few hypotheses but no theory has yet emerged about a significant bio-geological event that happened fifty-five million years ago. What we know for sure was that there was a sudden, enormous influx of carbon that has dissolved in the ocean and atmosphere. As atmospheric CO2 content increased, the average global surface temperature rose 5°C to 9°C (9°F to 16°F). This global warming event is called the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and lasted for 170,000 years. Events triggered […]

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  • How Does the Purple Bacteria Photosynthesize? Beckman Institute-UIUC (2015)

    How Does the Purple Bacteria Photosynthesize? Beckman Institute-UIUC (2015)

    Imagine a time when our young Earth was spinning much faster and days were only 8 hours! Our sun was much cooler and less bright than today. There was no oxygen in the atmosphere. Those were the conditions when first photosynthetic organisms with purple pigments evolved in liquid environments. In this animation we see one such ancestral form of early anoxic photosynthesis taking place in the purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides in which oxygen is not produced. Life evolved into oxygen […]

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  • Dingo of the Australia – Adam Geiger (2013)

    Dingo of the Australia – Adam Geiger (2013)

    Dingo (Canis lupus dingo) appears in the archaeological record of Australia at 4230 years before present. They ruled the continent as apex predators together with the now extinct Tasmanian tiger within the last few thousand years. Dingoes successfully colonized the continent spreading into diverse habitats including tropical rainforests, temperate Eucalyptus forests, mountainous highlands and grasslands. The only exception is the dry inhospitable central deserts. Researchers hypothesize that the Dingo was brought into Australia from Southeastern Asia and perhaps from India […]

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  • The Science of Camera Sensors – FimmakerIQ (2015)

    The Science of Camera Sensors – FimmakerIQ (2015)

    Camera technology has come a long way since the legendary Akeley gyroscope camera that made filming of truly historic documentary films such as Nanook of the North (1922) and Grass (1922). Now everything digital, an overview of the modern camera sensors is useful for naturalists. This lecture by FilmmakerIQ is a part of the Technical Notes series by Nature Documentaries aiming to compile useful technical, theoretical and practical knowledge for documentary filmmakers. The episode illustrates the electronic working principles of […]

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  • The History and Science of Lenses – FilmmakerIQ (2015)

    The History and Science of Lenses – FilmmakerIQ (2015)

    Glass has been a truly transformational material in Human history. Among many other remarkable things glass helped us understand and control properties of light. From photocopying machines to fiber optic cables glass revolutionized our lives. Gutenberg’s printing machine was a turning point with an unintended consequence. Printing created a huge demand for spectacles and glasswork craftsmanship in Europe literally exploded. Craftsmanship that built spectacles lead to building of more specialized optical instruments including microscopes, telescopes and eventually cameras. For all […]

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  • Depth of Field and Lens Equivalents – FilmmakerIQ (2016)

    Depth of Field and Lens Equivalents – FilmmakerIQ (2016)

    How does one achieve a sharp and clear image? What is depth of field? What is depth of focus? What affects their shallowness? This episode from FilmmakerIQ nicely explains the theory behind using the physics of light. Before starting the lecture you should have some basic understanding of the camera lenses such as the aperture. This is a part of the Technical Notes series of Nature Documentaries aiming to compile useful technical, theoretical and practical knowledge for documentary filmmakers. The […]

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  • The History of Frame Rate for Film – FilmmakerIQ (2015)

    The History of Frame Rate for Film – FilmmakerIQ (2015)

    This is a great breakdown of seemingly arbitrary and highly variable frame rates we experience today. Until the incorporation of sound which arrived as a superbly egalitarian/standardizing factor into the film, the frame rates were rather floppy. This lecture by FilmmakerIQ is a part of the Technical Notes series by Nature Documentaries aiming to compile useful technical, theoretical and practical knowledge for documentary filmmakers. The compact episode introduces the historical transitions from hand-cranked cinematographic cameras into television and later to […]

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  • The Properties of Camera Lenses – FilmmakerIQ (2015)

    The Properties of Camera Lenses – FilmmakerIQ (2015)

    The Technical Notes series of Nature Documentaries aims to compile useful technical, theoretical and practical knowledge for documentary filmmakers. In this lecture from the FilmmakerIQ you will be exposed to some basic properties of the camera lenses such as the focal length and the aperture. The episode is also a good segway into sensor technology which also gets covered in more detail in another episode. The episode gives a quick primer on focal length, field of view, diffraction theory and […]

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  • Bald Eagle Cam – Live from Minnesota – Breeding Season 2016

    Bald Eagle Cam – Live from Minnesota – Breeding Season 2016

    The 2016 breeding season for a pair of iconic Bald Eagles in Minnesota has started. After pair bonding and nest repair (nestoration) eagles started incubating eggs again in! A pair of iconic Bald Eagles have been raising their chicks in Central Minnesota on a nest constructed at 75 feet altitude on a cottonwood tree. You can learn more about this nest from the FAQs page of the website hosting this nestcam. Last year on March 9th Mom got into labor […]

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  • Decorah Eagle Cam – Nesting Season 2016

    Decorah Eagle Cam – Nesting Season 2016

    Live feed has begun from the new nest named N2 for Decorah bald eagles. The pair known as “Mom” and “Dad” are visiting and maintaining the nest occasionally. Established by the Raptor Resource Project in 2007 this breeding pair of Bald Eagles in Decorah, Iowa has been under intense observation. The pair became famous after the PBS Nature Documentary “American Eagle” in 2008. At one point in 2012 the viewer numbers reached 250 million making the project the most heavily […]

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  • Visitors of Jerusalem Thorn (Paliurus spina-christi)

    Visitors of Jerusalem Thorn (Paliurus spina-christi)

    The Jerusalem Thorn (Paliurus spina-christi) is a native evergreen bush of the Mediterranean basin belonging to the Buckthorn family (Rhamnaceae). As you might have already guessed from its scientific name, this is the plant depicted as a torture device (the crown of thorns) on prophet Jesus Christ’s head. The genus Paliurus is quite recognizable by its orbicular-winged fruit. The fossil record for the genus is widespread in the Northern Hemisphere and goes back to the middle Eocene epoch (~34 million […]

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  • Brown Bears during Salmon Run in Katmai National Park – Live from Alaska

    Brown Bears during Salmon Run in Katmai National Park – Live from Alaska

    Live streaming video by Ustream Hi everyone. Bearcam should be back live very soon. Work to upgrade and repair the cams begins Tues., June 9. STAY TUNED! [Both video streams have no sound and will be off air when it’s night time in Alaska] (Ursus arctos) are Caniform (dog-like) mammals. Except the polar bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) who is strictly a carnivore all other brown bears (Grizzly, Kodiak and Siberian brown bear) are omnivores and biologically are the same species. […]

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