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  • 48 Cantones: The Mayan Forest – Thomas & Julian Moll-Rocek (2014)

    48 Cantones: The Mayan Forest – Thomas & Julian Moll-Rocek (2014)

    In their documentary, Thomas & Julian Moll-Rocek explore the Mayan Cosmovision. For Meso-Americans this is a worldview that integrates the structure of space and rhythms of time into a unified whole. In Guatemala’s western mountains, in the state of Totonicapán, a large community forest has prospered for centuries adjacent to densely populated valleys. The Mayan forest cover the hills and the mountain ridge. The management of local resources by the Mayan community provides a counter-argument for the ‘tragedy of the […]

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  • Development of a Salamander Embryo – Yale University Department of Anatomy (1920s)

    Development of a Salamander Embryo – Yale University Department of Anatomy (1920s)

    Everyone of us started life from one single cell formed by the fusion of an egg and a sperm. That single cell gave rise to every structure in our bodies. How did that happen? Salamanders are known to be able to regenerate limbs while frogs and lizards cannot. How and why? The time lapsed footage of salamander embryos developing from single fertilized eggs forms the basis of our morphological understanding of animal development. The footage recorded by Yale University researchers […]

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  • Dingo of the Australia – Adam Geiger (2013)

    Dingo of the Australia – Adam Geiger (2013)

    Dingo (Canis lupus dingo) appears in the archaeological record of Australia at 4230 years before present. They ruled the continent as apex predators together with the now extinct Tasmanian tiger within the last few thousand years. Dingoes successfully colonized the continent spreading into diverse habitats including tropical rainforests, temperate Eucalyptus forests, mountainous highlands and grasslands. The only exception is the dry inhospitable central deserts. Dog domestication is the earliest among other animals going back to 40,000 years ago. The Dingo […]

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  • Run Hide be Invisible – Revealing the Leopard – PBS/NATURE (2010)

    Run Hide be Invisible – Revealing the Leopard – PBS/NATURE (2010)

    The Leopard (Felis pardus Linnaeus, 1758) is one of the most successful big cats of our time. It’s ability to adapt to different climates and habitats enabled spreading out of Africa into Asia. They live in diverse habitats such as forests, subtropical and tropical savannas, grasslands, rocky and mountainous regions, and even deserts. The leopard can live in both warm and cold climates. It has a very broad food base ranging from insects to large mammals. In Africa this cat […]

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  • How mountaintop mining affects life and landscape in West Virginia – PBS (2017)

    How mountaintop mining affects life and landscape in West Virginia – PBS (2017)

    Coal has been one of the work horses of power generation but its dominance is dwindling. In 2016 U.S. coal energy industry employed around 160,000 workers while solar energy production employed around 370,000. Coal has been a massive contributor to the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere leading to mercury pollution with subsequent biomagnification throughout the food chain, ocean acidification and global warming. Some geologists propose that fossil fuel use including coal may be accepted as an indicator for […]

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  • Plants are Cool Too! (All Episodes)

    Plants are Cool Too! (All Episodes)

    The “Plants are Cool Too!” series is supported by the Botanical Society of America (BSA) and hosted by Dr. Chris Martine. Here you will find all episodes of the series in reverse chronological order (last-in-first-out). In this next episode, we go to strip Philadelphia where its mountains have been strip mined for coal relentlessly for more than 200 years. Surface mines created vast areas of degraded lands. Coal has been a massive contributor to the accumulation of carbon dioxide in […]

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  • Observations and Simulations of 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season by NASA

    Observations and Simulations of 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season by NASA

    Atlantic hurricane season typically starts from June 1 and ends in November 30 in the northern Atlantic. There’s a noticeable peak from late August through September. Each season peak activity occurs around September 10th. During the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season there was an unusually high cyclone activity surpassing any other season. The number of category 5 hurricanes, and the most intense hurricane ever measured (Hurricane Wilma) by atmospheric pressure was recorded during this time period. The visualization ’27 Storms: Arlene […]

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  • Total Solar Eclipse in North America – Path of Totality – NASA/SVS (2017)

    Total Solar Eclipse in North America – Path of Totality – NASA/SVS (2017)

    During the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse, the Moon’s umbral shadow will traverse across the North American continent, from Oregon to South Carolina. Transition from west to east coast will last a little over 90 minutes. Along the path of totality, observers will see the Moon completely obscure the Sun for about two and a half minutes. The math used to calculate the trajectory of the eclipses to create maps such as the one featured here was worked out […]

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  • Parasitoid Wasp (Labena grallator) Ovipositing

    Parasitoid Wasp (Labena grallator) Ovipositing

    Recorded at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD, USA on July 18th 2017. Here you can see a parasitoid Ichneumon wasp (Labena grallator) searching for a prey living inside a dead branch. She uses her antennae to locate the prey and sets out to drill with her ovipositor straight into the wood. She does a few exploratory oviposition exercise before committing to a full injection. At multiple instances the wasp is chased away by ants. Indeed, in the last […]

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  • NASA TV live

    NASA TV live

    Ever since the successful landing of Mars rover Curiosity in August 6th of 2012, NASA TV broadcasts have experienced a big surge in viewers. Since then many other successful missions and interesting Earth-based as well as cosmic phenomena have been transmitted to curious masses of viewers all over the world. NASA TV has a rich body of programming including about analysis of significant global events such as the Chelyabinsk airburst event. There are regular broadcasts from the International Space Station. […]

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  • Hover Fly (Spilomyia longicornis) on Eupatorium altissimum (Asteraceae)

    Hover Fly (Spilomyia longicornis) on Eupatorium altissimum (Asteraceae)

    Hover Fly (Spilomyia longicornis) visiting Eupatorium altissimum (Asteraceae) filmed in Georgia State Botanical Gardens, Athens, GA, USA on September 16th, 2012. Submitted as a short observation. When we talk about pollination bees immediately occupy our imagination almost as a cerebral Pavlovian reflex. Flies are big component of the insect pollinators yet they rarely get peoples attention. The insect family Syrphidae (aka syrphid flies) has more than more than 6000 species categorized in 200 genera worldwide. They stand out with their […]

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  • A Deeper Creek – The Watchable Waters of Appalachia

    A Deeper Creek – The Watchable Waters of Appalachia

    Ecofocus Film Festival of Athens GA featured a number of short documentaries including Hidden Rivers of Appalachia filmed on location in Conesauga River by Freshwaters Illustrated. Like birdwatching, riverwatching could be a great immersive activity and have the potential to become a citizen science project. A Deeper Creek shows us how this could be done. Similar to organizing a BioBlitz, snorkeling in a river can generate a lot of informative observations. Rivers have a rich body of natural history and […]

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  • Open-air Processional Column Termites in Bukit Timah Nature Preserve, Singapore (2016)

    Open-air Processional Column Termites in Bukit Timah Nature Preserve, Singapore (2016)

    Social insects are a major force in land habitats. A mature leaf-cutter ant colony can consume leaf material equal to a weight of a cow every day. Termites are another insect group (related to cockroaches) evolved independently to achieve sociality. Their effects on ecosystems in terms of material and nutrient cycling can rival those of ants. Higher termites (family Termitidae) feed on a wide variety of plant-based material, including decaying wood, leaf litter, humus, fungi, lichens, dung, and grasses. Non-wood-feeding […]

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  • The Diatomist – Matthew Killip (2014)

    The Diatomist – Matthew Killip (2014)

    Klaus Kemp, is a self-taught master of the Victorian art of diatom arrangement. After his first exposure to the intricate patterns of algae by the German microscopist J.D. Möller (1844 – 1907) he was completely hooked. Diatoms are single celled algae. They are the most common form of phytoplanktons and form the base of the aquatic food chains. They represent the earliest plant lineage long before land plants evolved at about 700 million years ago. Their cell walls are made […]

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  • Seed Dispersal and Habitat Fragmentation | HHMI BioInteractive – Danny Schmidt (2017)

    Seed Dispersal and Habitat Fragmentation | HHMI BioInteractive – Danny Schmidt (2017)

    Forests are under intense pressure. In the tropical forests, between 50-90 % of the canopy trees depend on animals for seed dispersal. Even in temperate forests animals such as deer, moose, boar and even bears disperse seeds. Today due to hunting for bush meat many tropical forests are becoming depleted of their seed dispersers. Here in this HHMI documentary, the researchers Andres Link and Carolina Urbina Malo of Los Andes University in Colombia in Colombia track brown spider monkeys to […]

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